Year:2024   Volume: 6   Issue: 1   Area: Higher Education Research

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  3. ID: 989

Aseel Said AL-HASANAT, Mohammad Auad SHUİBAT

DEGREE OF EMPLOYING TECHNOLOGY IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION AMONG GOVERNMENTAL SCHOOL PRINCIPALS IN BETHLEHEM AND ITS OBSTACLES FROM THEIR POINT OF VIEW

The study aimed to examine the extent of technology utilization in school administration among principals of government schools in the Bethlehem Governorate, as well as the obstacles perceived by them. The researchers used a simple random sample of 46 individuals from the study population. They employed a questionnaire as a tool for data collection within the descriptive-analytical methodology. The study found that the degree of technology utilization in school administration among principals of government schools in the Bethlehem Governorate, was high with an average total score of 3.9. The findings also indicated that there were differences in technology usage based on gender, favoring male principals, and years of experience, favoring those with 10 or more years of experience. However, there were no differences based on the field of specialization. Furthermore, the study identified several obstacles to technology utilization in school administration where responses came moderate, with the lack of an adequate education budget being the most significant challenge. Based on the results, the study recommended the need to prioritize increasing the budget allocated to schools by the Ministry of Education, which would assist in building the necessary infrastructure for technological system development in schools. Additionally, it suggested providing specialized training and qualification programs for principals in the field of technology, as this would enhance the use of technology in education. The study also emphasized the importance of conducting further research on technology utilization in ducational administration in other Palestinian governorates

Keywords: School Administration, Employing Technology In School Administration

http://dx.doi.org/10.47832/2717-8293.27.22


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